POWERFUL TESTIMONIES & PHOTOS: The harsh journey endured by the 629 rescued people to Valencia

"To pass through that place you see people asking you to drink your urine, as there's no water"

Monday, June 18, 2018 — Following the press release we shared with you yesterday regarding the disembarkation in 629 rescued people from the rescue vessel Aquarius in Valencia, Spain, we would like to share with you a selection of powerful high res photos of the rescued people’s journey and their testimonies.

The rescued recount stories of despair and their harsh journey from as far as Sierra Leone and South Sudan, their brutal stay in Libya and the final push to reach Italy in unseaworthy rubber dinghies.

These people have been at the centre of tense stand-off in the central Mediterranean Sea after Italy and Malta refused the Aquarius (jointly operated by SOS MEDITERRANNEE and Doctors Without Borders [MSF]) authorisation to disembark them in the nearest safe port. Because of this the exhausted, injured and shocked people had to endure four more days on rough seas to finally reach Spain where they were received yesterday.

 “I've been in Libya since 2016. Living there is from hell to hell. I've been from prison, to prison to prison. I have not yet cried my tears of joy. I went from Sierra Leone to Agadez to Sabha, it took me two weeks in the desert. That desert is not an easy journey. To pass through that place you see people asking you to drink your urine, as there's no water. It's all they have. I saw people begging and dying in-front of me, everyday along the desert. You really must have strength to survive, if you don't have strength, you die.  I saw many men fall down, we don't wait for them, we keep walking,” says Moses, one of those rescued. 

“Even with Italy rejecting us, we are even more traumatised. We don't wanna go back to Libya. We don't wanna go to Malta. For Italy to reject us, there must be a reason. Whatever happened, is happening for a reason. I am more than excited to reach Spain!,” Moses adds.

Like Moses, most of the rescued people have heart-rending stories to tell and coming to Spain is a huge relief for many who look forward to starting a new life.

Ahead of the European Council meeting this week, MSF calls on European governments to put human lives first – not politicking. European states must facilitate swift disembarkation in the closest safe ports in Europe where rescued people can receive adequate care, and ensure those in need of international protection are able to apply for asylum or other forms of protection. They must not obstruct independent non-governmental search and rescue initiatives and must set up a proactive, dedicated search and rescue mechanism in the Central Mediterranean.

“European governments must appreciate the importance of search and rescue. More than 500 people have drowned in 2018 while attempting the perilous journey on unseaworthy dinghies across the Central Mediterranean. According to news reports, 12 people died this week in one incident in which a US naval ship rescued 40 survivors after their dinghy capsized,” says Karline Kleijer, MSF Head of Emergencies.

“As the doctor on board the Aquarius I consider it a privilege to care for these 630 cold, hungry, and tired people. I take my responsibility seriously and will speak to their humanity in the face of cynical and hypocritical governments,” says Dr David Beversluis, MSF medical doctor onboard the Aquarius.

“I have seen the suffering of these people as they boarded our ship. I have heard the horrific stories of their journeys. The young Nigerians I talked with earlier this week, and every other person attempting the dangerous Mediterranean crossing, whether on the Aquarius or not, wish desperately to trade the nightmares they’ve been living for grander dreams. It is time that Europe finally takes responsibility for protecting them, and reached out from the horizon with welcoming arms,” adds Beversluis.

The Aquarius is one of only a few remaining independent non-governmental search and rescue vessels still operating in the Central Mediterranean. Yet this does not mean the need is gone. By 8 June, the Aquarius had already rescued and/or transferred 2,350 people in 2018, all of whom would otherwise have drowned. Independent search and rescue capacity has dwindled over the past year due to bureaucratic barriers and legal proceedings against staff working for non-governmental search and rescue initiatives. 

Aquarius has transferred over 500 persons to two Italian Navy ships, at the request of the Italian MRCC. Aquarius was instructed by Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre in Rome to sail to Valencia to disembark the remaining 106 people.<br/><br/>While this appears to be a quick fix to the current political standoff, this should not set a precedent for future disembarkations. Rescued people should be disembarked in the nearest safe port available. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Aquarius has transferred over 500 persons to two Italian Navy ships, at the request of the Italian MRCC. Aquarius was instructed by Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre in Rome to sail to Valencia to disembark the remaining 106 people.<br/><br/>While this appears to be a quick fix to the current political standoff, this should not set a precedent for future disembarkations. Rescued people should be disembarked in the nearest safe port available. Photographer: Lauren King
Aquarius is approaching the port of Valencia in Spain and is ready to disembark 106 rescued persons. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Aquarius is approaching the port of Valencia in Spain and is ready to disembark 106 rescued persons. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Aquarius is currently in the process of transferring 400 persons to two Italian Navy ships, at the request of the Italian MRCC. Aquarius was instructed by Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre in Rome to sail to Valencia to disembark the remaining 229 people.<br/><br/>While this appears to be a quick fix to the current political standoff, this should not set a precedent for future disembarkations. Rescued people should be disembarked in the nearest safe port available. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Aquarius is currently in the process of transferring 400 persons to two Italian Navy ships, at the request of the Italian MRCC. Aquarius was instructed by Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre in Rome to sail to Valencia to disembark the remaining 229 people.<br/><br/>While this appears to be a quick fix to the current political standoff, this should not set a precedent for future disembarkations. Rescued people should be disembarked in the nearest safe port available. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Aquarius is currently in the process of transferring 400 persons to two Italian Navy ships, at the request of the Italian MRCC. Aquarius was instructed by Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre in Rome to sail to Valencia to disembark the remaining 229 people.<br/><br/>While this appears to be a quick fix to the current political standoff, this should not set a precedent for future disembarkations. Rescued people should be disembarked in the nearest safe port available. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Aquarius is currently in the process of transferring 400 persons to two Italian Navy ships, at the request of the Italian MRCC. Aquarius was instructed by Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre in Rome to sail to Valencia to disembark the remaining 229 people.<br/><br/>While this appears to be a quick fix to the current political standoff, this should not set a precedent for future disembarkations. Rescued people should be disembarked in the nearest safe port available. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Children rescued in #Mediterranean and now safe onboard #Aquarius were pleased to receive toys yesterday.<br/><br/><br/>Another long day on Aquarius as she crosses the Mediterranean heading towards safe port of Valencia. MSF team hope to arrive on Sunday morning. The shipwreck survivors onboard are looking forward to seeing dry land at last and for this ordeal to come to an end. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Children rescued in Mediterranean and now safe onboard Aquarius were pleased to receive toys yesterday. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is urging European Member States to facilitate the immediate disembarkation of 629 people rescued over the weekend in Mediterranean and now onboard Aquarius, a dedicated search and rescue vessel run by SOS MEDITERRANEE in partnership with MSF. Aquarius remains in international waters off Malta and Italy, the countries with the closest ports of safety but which continue to refuse permission to dock. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Hi my name is Ali. I am from Nigeria, I am 18 years of age. I lost my parents when I was 11 years old from a car accident. Since then I was raised by my grandparents. Growing up in my homeland without my parents was the most difficult thing for me, until reaching Libya. Reasons I say this, Libya is no place for any living person. They take everything from you including your spirit and crush it. <br/><br/>I wanted to travel to Europe thru Libya. A friend of my parents financed my way to a better place, from the violence. <br/>At some point during the night, one of the light skinned men boarded the boat and told us to, head straight, pointing to the stars and said follow those...they mean north, you must go north to land. He said it would take us three-four hours to land. I was terrified, but also relieved by it would only take so little time to freedom. Libya, is a violent place where many people are raped and murdered. I am glad I wasn't one of them. <br/>We were 135 in the boat. It was complete darkness when we left. Sadly none of us had life-jackets. They wanted much money for them, none of us had enough. We spent almost 24 hours in the sea, we left on Friday at 9pm, and we were rescued at 9pm on Saturday by your people. Before we were rescued, our boat was almost half filled with water, myself and the others were so scared. We when fell in the sea, it was cold and dark, I was completely naked in the sea, people were tearing at me, my clothes, everything they could get their hands on to stay alive. I fought very hard to get the life-jackets you were throwing to us. After a few, I managed to get one and shouted for help! I was rescued and then given medical treatment. <br/>I am okay now, very happy for your organization. You saved my life, I am very grateful to you and everyone on this boat. My main goal is to be a doctor. I need an education and support. I want to save lives. I want my nation, the world to be proud of me. At the end of the day, I wanna be a doctor to help my country, because in Africa, they are a lot of people suffering. My dream has always been about being a doctor to save lives and seeing it live on this ship, I know now, this will always be my dream. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Ibrahim, 20 from Sudan <br/><br/>I was beaten with an iron bar and then with rubber, while the men filmed and laughed at me. They were filming to force my family back home for money, for my freedom. They kept sending videos and images of them beating me daily, demanding more and more money. This all happened in a house, in Sabha almost a year ago. I started my journey in Al-Qatron, in Libya. I went there for work, but when I arrived, I was auctioned off to other men by light-skinned men. I was sold for 1,000 Libyan dinars. <br/>The man who bought me, continued with the beatings, everyday. Barely any food, only salt water and crackers. That he threw at me and I ate them off the ground, like an animal. I only asked for food. Anything you ask for, I was hit. Prison would have been better than this man's house. It was a hole. <br/>I suffered so much there. Once I saw a man, a friend of the owner of me, he was drunk. He came to this house and took some other black men to his truck, and shot them. After they died, a friend and I had to pick up the bodies and bury them. I had to stay with him until I paid my way out. I finally made my way to the sea, after six months with this horrible man. I understood the risk of taking this passage. One thing I didn't, that it would take three/four days to Italy. We were told it would take a couple hours to freedom. I had no idea the crossing would be so large. I thought it would be small, where you get on the boat and sail for a few hours and see land. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
MSF is only doing search and rescue in Mediterranean because EU states are not doing it and people are needlessly drowning. Not only do people in distress at sea need to be rescued, they need to be treated with compassion, dignity and respect. We try to do that on Aquarius.<br/><br/>Many refugee and migrants have endured alarming levels of violence and exploitation in Libya and during harrowing journeys from their home countries. Photographer: SOS MEditerranee
MSF is only doing search and rescue in Mediterranean because EU states are not doing it and people are needlessly drowning. Not only do people in distress at sea need to be rescued, they need to be treated with compassion, dignity and respect. We try to do that on Aquarius.<br/><br/>Many refugee and migrants have endured alarming levels of violence and exploitation in Libya and during harrowing journeys from their home countries. Photographer: SOS MEditerranee
MSF is only doing search and rescue in Mediterranean because EU states are not doing it and people are needlessly drowning. Not only do people in distress at sea need to be rescued, they need to be treated with compassion, dignity and respect. We try to do that on Aquarius.<br/><br/>Many refugee and migrants have endured alarming levels of violence and exploitation in Libya and during harrowing journeys from their home countries. Photographer: SOS MEditerranee
MSF is only doing search and rescue in Mediterranean because EU states are not doing it and people are needlessly drowning. Not only do people in distress at sea need to be rescued, they need to be treated with compassion, dignity and respect. We try to do that on Aquarius.<br/><br/>Many refugee and migrants have endured alarming levels of violence and exploitation in Libya and during harrowing journeys from their home countries. Photographer: SOS MEditerranee
MSF is only doing search and rescue in Mediterranean because EU states are not doing it and people are needlessly drowning. Not only do people in distress at sea need to be rescued, they need to be treated with compassion, dignity and respect. We try to do that on Aquarius.<br/><br/>Many refugee and migrants have endured alarming levels of violence and exploitation in Libya and during harrowing journeys from their home countries. Photographer: SOS MEditerranee
MSF medics are treating a man whose finger was partially amputated in Libya.<br/><br/>Many refugee and migrants have endured alarming levels of violence and exploitation in Libya and during harrowing journeys from their home countries. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
MSF medics on Aquarius continue painstaking daily dressing changes for more than 20 patients who have suffered serious fuel burns. If not treated properly, these burns will go on to cause chronic pain, disfigurement, and horrific scars. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Many refugee and migrants have endured alarming levels of violence and exploitation in Libya and during harrowing journeys from their home countries.<br/><br/>Oranges, cereal bars and bread - this is what the Aquarius has just received from the Italian coastguard as a food resupply. It’s a welcome delivery but the MSF medical team are still concerned about nutritional needs being met over the 3 day journey.<br/><br/>These supplies are essential for the long journey to Valencia, Spain. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Many refugee and migrants have endured alarming levels of violence and exploitation in Libya and during harrowing journeys from their home countries.<br/><br/>Weather conditions on Mediterranean worsened overnight and MSF team on Aquarius are treating many cases of seasickness. Photographer: Lauren King
Many refugee and migrants have endured alarming levels of violence and exploitation in Libya and during harrowing journeys from their home countries. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Moses <br/><br/>I've been in Libya since 2016. Lliving there is from hell to hell. I've been from prison, to prison to prison. I have not yet cried my tears of joy. I went from Sierra Leone to Agadez to Sabha, it took me two weeks in the desert. That desert is not an easy journey. To pass through that place you see people asking you to drink your urine, as there's no water. It's all they have. I saw people begging and dying in-front of me, everyday along the desert. You really must have strength to survive, if you don't have strength, you die. I saw many men fall down, we don't wait for them, we keep walking. On the way, we got in a van, I thank God, our driver was so intelligent. They run after us and we run into some place and hop in the van, he just tell everyone is lie down and he guarded us, while they were shooting, bam, bam, hitting the van. It were Libyans I am sure! They just catch people and put them in a place, ask for money, beat you, torture you. On our way coming, they sold us in Bani Walid. Bani Walid was hell. I see deaths. I cry for death. But death did not come. My first time in Bani Walid, I saw them shoot someone right in front of me, in prison. They asked to pay, and they give us time, but the Arab man, he just come and took some boys who were there a long time, just in front of me, pop, pop, pop. If you stay too long in the prison, they clean. By clean, it's not by washing, it's by shooting, older people and sending them to the desert, they just throw them away. One day, they shot my friend in front of my face, as he was taking too long to piss. The bullet hit him in the leg. They targeted to kill him. When they fall, they men ask us to carry the bodies to the desert. During one of these times, I noticed one of these boys was not dead, so we agreed not to say anything. I had some dinars on me and put it in his pocket and told him to make his way out. The next he couldn't make it, he died, because of the bullet wound and poison. <br/><br/>Like this lady in front of me now, the men there, they will let the women undress the man, ask them to bathe the men until their organ stands. I'm a man, I shouldn't need a women to bathe me. They tell the women to go SWAYSWAY, means slowly, slowly...If he don't feel anything, it's a big problem. They have to cut it, they cut it off. Many boys die from this. This is the hell that is Libya. <br/><br/>My turn, was the next day a man came to the prison to collect men for work. I said to the man, I can do the work. I say yes, I can do anything. On the way, I ran away. I escaped. I met some blacks in the next town working, I joined them. So I work and work, as my brother was inside there, so I pay his money to get him out of prison the first time. After he came out of the prison, we all came to Tripoli. We were there for some time, in a big garage. They were killing blacks. I managed to come to the seaside, where they catch me again, and I went back to Bani Walid. A black man sold me to an Arab man, back to Bani Walid. I spent about 7-8 months there. <br/><br/>When I escaped from the prison a second time, I went back to work for the previous people, there they saw my condition, and said this boy is terrible. They gave me a taxi directly to the seaside. In the seaside, the fighting started, in Sabratha. They catch many peoples, my brothers. many escaped, but the ones caught were and put back in a prion for deportation. I mean, deportation is good. Anywhere they see blacks together in Tripoli, they catch. We're there to work, to save money, to leave the country. There you're collected, all black, you clean, wipe and sweep. If you're lucky, they will pay you. If you're unlucky, they'll give you to the police. In order to survive, you gotta eat and do things. One day, the men come and catch us again. They took us the a military barracks. I was there for 2-3 days when a man came wanting fit men to go work for him. They use blacks like donkey. , like slaves. So they tell us to go and work, I work and work. To save enough money to cross the sea. <br/><br/>When we entered the boat there was some problem. The rescue team came first and then outta knowhere, the Libyan Coast Guard showed up. The rescue team turned back. <br/>They ended up opening fire on us! The rescue team, coundn't do anything, it was hopeless. No one died, but many people were injured, broken legs, many things happened. <br/>So we are unforturnate, they carried us back to Libya. I was very hopeless back then, this was sometime last year. Once on the ship the Libyans beat us, with rubber pipes and iron. Anything the lIbyans had in their hand, they will beat you. Sometimes they will beat you to death. I seen it. Once off the Libyan Coast Guard boat, they took us all to a detention center. At first they wanted to take us to an underground prison, but the guard said it was full of people. <br/><br/>My hope was just to be alive. If I should go back home, let me go back with my life. That was a bad day, with the beatings and I was feeling sick. One day, they all told us to go outside and play football, I was still ill, but the man said I should play. So I forcsed myself to play. After the football match, a man came and said he was taking us to another prison. He only took men from Sierra Leone & Gambians. We go. So we walk. An Libyan man saw that I was not stronge. He said do I want to go to prison again, I said no. He said, he doesn't like the way they're treating us in the prison. He told me to get outta the car, again he said get outta the car, If I get outta this car, it is probably a set up. Then my situation will get worse for me. He called his brother, he brought a tinted BWM, he then told us to come het into his car. So after a while, I came down and got into his car. When I entered the door, I looked right at the door, as I might try to oepn it and run, if anything goes wrong. He took us to a prison. Once I entered the prison, I was asked to go work for this guys borther in a shop. I said I am not strong enough, let me treat myself and then I will go to work for him. So this man, he carried me, to one of his brothers place. As he was carrying me, he gave me his brothers number to call and go work for hiom. During this time, I dropped the number. I didn't care. I knew I was gonna go work and be sold and worked again. <br/><br/>This was my second time in the boat, when I was finally rescued. The Italin Coast Guard rescued us, they were very nice to us. They didn't see out boat at first, so we manged to try and get close to them. A few minutes later, they saw us. They told us to calm down, we were all crying. as we spent roughly twently hours in the water. <br/>It was still light out, so I saw them put down their ladder, first were the women and children and then us, the men. When it came to the men, we all panicked. As we knew what happened the previous time, with the Libya Boast Guard taking us back. During the fighting, the boat it bursts. Everyone went down in the water. We were fighting to keep ourselves up. Finally I got my streangth, and climbed up and was rescued. No one died. <br/><br/>Even with Italy rejecting us, we are even more traumatized. We don't wanna go back to Libya. We don't wanna go to Malta. We wondered. But God, he did it. For Italy to reject us, there must be a reason. Whatever happened, is happening for a reason. I know God has a better plan for us. Italy rejected us, but God never will. I am more than excited to reach Spain! God worked his magic in this sea, that nothing happened to me. So I accept him to do more for us in Spain. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Moses <br/><br/>I've been in Libya since 2016. Lliving there is from hell to hell. I've been from prison, to prison to prison. I have not yet cried my tears of joy. I went from Sierra Leone to Agadez to Sabha, it took me two weeks in the desert. That desert is not an easy journey. To pass through that place you see people asking you to drink your urine, as there's no water. It's all they have. I saw people begging and dying in-front of me, everyday along the desert. You really must have strength to survive, if you don't have strength, you die. I saw many men fall down, we don't wait for them, we keep walking. On the way, we got in a van, I thank God, our driver was so intelligent. They run after us and we run into some place and hop in the van, he just tell everyone is lie down and he guarded us, while they were shooting, bam, bam, hitting the van. It were Libyans I am sure! They just catch people and put them in a place, ask for money, beat you, torture you. On our way coming, they sold us in Bani Walid. Bani Walid was hell. I see deaths. I cry for death. But death did not come. My first time in Bani Walid, I saw them shoot someone right in front of me, in prison. They asked to pay, and they give us time, but the Arab man, he just come and took some boys who were there a long time, just in front of me, pop, pop, pop. If you stay too long in the prison, they clean. By clean, it's not by washing, it's by shooting, older people and sending them to the desert, they just throw them away. One day, they shot my friend in front of my face, as he was taking too long to piss. The bullet hit him in the leg. They targeted to kill him. When they fall, they men ask us to carry the bodies to the desert. During one of these times, I noticed one of these boys was not dead, so we agreed not to say anything. I had some dinars on me and put it in his pocket and told him to make his way out. The next he couldn't make it, he died, because of the bullet wound and poison. <br/><br/>Like this lady in front of me now, the men there, they will let the women undress the man, ask them to bathe the men until their organ stands. I'm a man, I shouldn't need a women to bathe me. They tell the women to go SWAYSWAY, means slowly, slowly...If he don't feel anything, it's a big problem. They have to cut it, they cut it off. Many boys die from this. This is the hell that is Libya. <br/><br/>My turn, was the next day a man came to the prison to collect men for work. I said to the man, I can do the work. I say yes, I can do anything. On the way, I ran away. I escaped. I met some blacks in the next town working, I joined them. So I work and work, as my brother was inside there, so I pay his money to get him out of prison the first time. After he came out of the prison, we all came to Tripoli. We were there for some time, in a big garage. They were killing blacks. I managed to come to the seaside, where they catch me again, and I went back to Bani Walid. A black man sold me to an Arab man, back to Bani Walid. I spent about 7-8 months there. <br/><br/>When I escaped from the prison a second time, I went back to work for the previous people, there they saw my condition, and said this boy is terrible. They gave me a taxi directly to the seaside. In the seaside, the fighting started, in Sabratha. They catch many peoples, my brothers. many escaped, but the ones caught were and put back in a prion for deportation. I mean, deportation is good. Anywhere they see blacks together in Tripoli, they catch. We're there to work, to save money, to leave the country. There you're collected, all black, you clean, wipe and sweep. If you're lucky, they will pay you. If you're unlucky, they'll give you to the police. In order to survive, you gotta eat and do things. One day, the men come and catch us again. They took us the a military barracks. I was there for 2-3 days when a man came wanting fit men to go work for him. They use blacks like donkey. , like slaves. So they tell us to go and work, I work and work. To save enough money to cross the sea. <br/><br/>When we entered the boat there was some problem. The rescue team came first and then outta knowhere, the Libyan Coast Guard showed up. The rescue team turned back. <br/>They ended up opening fire on us! The rescue team, coundn't do anything, it was hopeless. No one died, but many people were injured, broken legs, many things happened. <br/>So we are unforturnate, they carried us back to Libya. I was very hopeless back then, this was sometime last year. Once on the ship the Libyans beat us, with rubber pipes and iron. Anything the lIbyans had in their hand, they will beat you. Sometimes they will beat you to death. I seen it. Once off the Libyan Coast Guard boat, they took us all to a detention center. At first they wanted to take us to an underground prison, but the guard said it was full of people. <br/><br/>My hope was just to be alive. If I should go back home, let me go back with my life. That was a bad day, with the beatings and I was feeling sick. One day, they all told us to go outside and play football, I was still ill, but the man said I should play. So I forcsed myself to play. After the football match, a man came and said he was taking us to another prison. He only took men from Sierra Leone & Gambians. We go. So we walk. An Libyan man saw that I was not stronge. He said do I want to go to prison again, I said no. He said, he doesn't like the way they're treating us in the prison. He told me to get outta the car, again he said get outta the car, If I get outta this car, it is probably a set up. Then my situation will get worse for me. He called his brother, he brought a tinted BWM, he then told us to come het into his car. So after a while, I came down and got into his car. When I entered the door, I looked right at the door, as I might try to oepn it and run, if anything goes wrong. He took us to a prison. Once I entered the prison, I was asked to go work for this guys borther in a shop. I said I am not strong enough, let me treat myself and then I will go to work for him. So this man, he carried me, to one of his brothers place. As he was carrying me, he gave me his brothers number to call and go work for hiom. During this time, I dropped the number. I didn't care. I knew I was gonna go work and be sold and worked again. <br/><br/>This was my second time in the boat, when I was finally rescued. The Italin Coast Guard rescued us, they were very nice to us. They didn't see out boat at first, so we manged to try and get close to them. A few minutes later, they saw us. They told us to calm down, we were all crying. as we spent roughly twently hours in the water. <br/>It was still light out, so I saw them put down their ladder, first were the women and children and then us, the men. When it came to the men, we all panicked. As we knew what happened the previous time, with the Libya Boast Guard taking us back. During the fighting, the boat it bursts. Everyone went down in the water. We were fighting to keep ourselves up. Finally I got my streangth, and climbed up and was rescued. No one died. <br/><br/>Even with Italy rejecting us, we are even more traumatized. We don't wanna go back to Libya. We don't wanna go to Malta. We wondered. But God, he did it. For Italy to reject us, there must be a reason. Whatever happened, is happening for a reason. I know God has a better plan for us. Italy rejected us, but God never will. I am more than excited to reach Spain! God worked his magic in this sea, that nothing happened to me. So I accept him to do more for us in Spain. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Oranges, cereal bars and bread - this is what the Aquarius has just received from the Italian coastguard as a food resupply. It’s a welcome delivery but the MSF medical team are still concerned about nutritional needs being met over the 3 day journey.<br/><br/>These supplies are essential for the long journey to Valencia, Spain. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
People disembark search and rescue vessel Aquarius, operated by SOS Méditerranée in partnership with Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF), in Valencia, Spain. The disembarkation is the end of a terrible ordeal for the men, women and children who spent multiple days at sea. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
People disembark search and rescue vessel Aquarius, operated by SOS Méditerranée in partnership with Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF), in Valencia, Spain. The disembarkation is the end of a terrible ordeal for the men, women and children who spent multiple days at sea. Photographer: Kenny Karpov/
Weather conditions on Mediterranean worsened overnight and MSF team on Aquarius are treating many cases of seasickness. Photographer: Kenny Karpov
Angela Makamure Press Officer at Doctors Without Borders (MSF) Southern Africa