PHOTOS: Mozambican refugees flee growing violence to Kapise village, Malawi

Thursday, February 18, 2016 — Doctors Without Borders this week asked South African photographer James Oatway to visualsie situation facing over 5,800 Mozambicans (1,000 families) who have fled increasing violence in northern Tete Province, and are now existing in inhumane conditions in a makeshift camp in Kapise village in neighboring Malawi, 300 meters from the border. This week, South African photographer James Oatway visited the camp on MSF’s request to capture camp conditions, which are well below minimum humanitarian standards. The refugees are forced to compete for scarce resources (water, sanitation) with the existing 150 families already living in the village.

Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. They are living in precarious conditions well below internationally recognized humanitarian standards. © James Oatway / MSF
People queue outside a Doctors Without Borders (MSF) clinic. <br/><br/>Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. Half of the consultations in the MSF clinics are malaria cases. © James Oatway / MSF
People queue outside a Doctors Without Borders (MSF) clinic. <br/><br/>Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. Half of the consultations in the MSF clinics are malaria cases. © James Oatway / MSF
Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique. The overcrowding and the nature of the makeshift constructions in the camp, made of foraged wood and grass, make it a fire hazard. © James Oatway / MSF
A woman prepares maize in the Kapise 2 settlement. Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. They are living in precarious conditions well below internationally recognized humanitarian standards. © James Oatway / MSF
This woman has picked the leaves of Sweet Potato plants to cook with - despite this not being a proper food if eaten alone. Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. They are living in precarious conditions well below the internationally recognized humanitarian standards. © James Oatway / MSF
Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. They are living in precarious conditions well below the internationally recognized humanitarian standards. Water and sanitation are particularly acute problems, with 14 latrines available, well below the 290 that would be in accordance with humanitarian emergency standards. © James Oatway / MSF
A man builds a shelter. Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique. The overcrowding and the nature of the makeshift constructions in the camp, made of foraged wood and grass, make it a fire hazard. © James Oatway / MSF
A 22 year old woman tends to a fire. Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique. The overcrowding and the nature of the makeshift constructions in the camp, made of foraged wood and grass, make it a fire hazard. © James Oatway / MSF
Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. © James Oatway / MSF
Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique. The satellite camp of Kapise 2, less overcrowded than the main one, is in the background. The rocky outcrop seen in the background is already beyond the border between Mozambique and Malawi. © James Oatway / MSF
Portrait of a 24 year old woman and her child. Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. © James Oatway / MSF
Portrait of a child who is one of over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. © James Oatway / MSF
This woman is one of the over 5.800 Mozambican nationals who have been camping in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique. © James Oatway / MSF
Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. As the camp was built without pre-planning overcrowding has become severe, with high fire hazard for the makeshift shelters. © James Oatway / MSF
People queue outside a water storage and pump facility built by Medecins Sans Frontiers (MSF). The satellite camp of Kapise 2, less overcrowded than the main one, is in the background. The rock in the background is already beyond border between Mozambique and Malawi. <br/><br/>Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique. The only regular water source in the village has ran dry and the only way to get water is from few pre-existing sources and the two additional boreholes respectively rehabilitated and constructed by MSF. Even then, waiting time is at times up to 2.5 hours at the water pump and with the continuous influx of people, the capacity of the borehole today can only provide around 8 liters of water per person per day, well below the minimum humanitarian standards of 15-20L. © James Oatway / MSF
People queue at an Medecins Sans Frontiers (MSF) built water pump. Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. The only regular water source in the village has ran dry and the only way to get water is from few pre-existing sources and the two additional boreholes respectively rehabilitated and constructed by MSF. Even then, waiting times up to 2.5 hours at the water pump and with the continuous influx of people, the capacity of the borehole today can only provide around 8 liters of water per person per day, well below the minimum humanitarian standards of 15-20L. © James Oatway / MSF
Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique. The overcrowding and the nature of the makeshift constructions in the camp, made of foraged wood and grass, make it a fire hazard. © James Oatway / MSF
Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. They are living in precarious conditions well below internationally recognized humanitarian standards. © James Oatway / MSF
Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique, the majority of them women, children and the elderly. © James Oatway / MSF
Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique. © James Oatway / MSF
People queue outside a water storage and pump facility built by Medecins Sans Frontiers (MSF). Over 5.800 Mozambican nationals have camped in the village of Kapise 2 in Malawi after fleeing their homes in Mozambique. The only regular water source in the village has ran dry and the only way to get water is from few pre-existing sources and the two additional boreholes respectively rehabilitated and constructed by MSF. Even then, waiting times times up to 2.5 hours at the water pump and with the continuous influx of people, the capacity of the borehole today can only provide around 8 liters of water per person per day, well below the minimum humanitarian standards of 15-20L. © James Oatway / MSF